Friday, October 23, 2020

New Voices Volume 011

New Voices Volume 011

2020 was a year none of us will soon forget, but we’d rather…

At least we have some decent fiction – fantasies and mysteries in exotic surroundings as well as the ordinary.

Our latest anthology of this year’s works has all of these in a single volume. And we collect the last of this election year’s artistic output into this single volume.

Of course, we also have a little satire, with a president making his appearance in two of our stories. And while his opponent didn’t appear, the riots did. Even our authors are not immune to being inspired by the reported events, though I can assure you none of them were ever in personal danger from these or that pesky virus which only spread worse the more you tried to lock it down…

And that sounds like some editor should put a bug in one of their ears with a new idea for a story.

For now, I’ll leave you to this marvelous collection of these New Voices stories.

Excerpt:

THE SMALL TWIN-ENGINE plane rocked in the sudden thunder storm, lightning flashed outside. Cabin lights flickered on and off. Along with the sky flashes exposing the passenger’s drawn faces to alternate pitch black and brilliant white.

Besides the pilot and the stewardess, the only occupants in the rocking craft were a man, his very pregnant wife, and an attending doctor.

In the midst of the thunder and whining engines, A cry rang out, then another.

Two young children entered this world inside that small airplane.

In the next minute, that craft pitched forward, pushing all the occupants against their seats. The husband and wife each holding tight onto one child each, while the doctor grasped his black medical bag to his chest with one hand, and the arm of his chair with the other – both hands white from a straining grip.

Seconds turned into eternity as the plane plummeted through the flashing clouds.

In the cockpit, the pilot was furiously working to level out the plane at least into a gliding pattern. All by brute force of his straining arms, legs, and back. At his side, strapped into the co-pilot seat, the stewardess was working through the re-start sequence to get the engines powered again, to get the hydraulics and electrical working once more.

With her practiced moves, any observer could see they had been through similar scenes before. Their quick, sure actions coming from repetitive training and sheer muscle-memory – despite the steep angle of descent and the continual rocking that shook the craft.

At last, the engines caught again, and lights flickered back on in the cabin. Thrusting the throttle full forward, the young woman in the co-pilot seat then helped the straining pilot pull back on the shared yoke of that plane, using the controls on her half of the small cockpit.

They got their too-rapid descent back under control only a few thousand feet above the storm-whipped waves. There the clouds left them as a retreating ceiling, and they were now below the cloud-to-cloud lightning. The rain had also quit – which gave the pilot and stewardess a clearer view. As the craft leveled out, the engines bit into head and side-winds – pulling them toward their nearest safe landing, still hundreds of miles away.

As the pilot pulled the throttle back to a more normal speed for the new conditions, the stewardess patted his shoulder. “I’d give you a kiss, lover, but I need to check on our guests.”

Anthology containing:

The Autists: Jenna by J. R. Kruze, S. H. Marpel
Idylls of a Lazurai by S. H. Marpel, J. R. Kruze
Riot Wall by S. H. Marpel, R. L. Saunders
The Eye In Team by J. R. Kruze, S. H. Marpel
The Case of the Tenacious Typist by S. H. Marpel, J. R. Kruze
The Girl Who Believed Tomorrow by J. R. Kruze
The Projector by S. H. Marpel, R. L. Saunders
The Panic of 2020 by S. H. Marpel, R. L. Saunders
Doppel by S. H. Marpel, R. L. Saunders

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Planet Stories: Golden Age Space Opera Tales

Planet Stories: Golden Age Space Opera Tales

Planet Stories was an American pulp science fiction magazine, published by Fiction House between 1939 and 1955. It featured interplanetary adventures, both in space and on other planets, and was initially focused on a young readership. Malcolm Reiss was editor or editor-in-chief for all of its 71 issues. Planet Stories was launched at the same time as Planet Comics, the success of which probably helped to fund the early issues of Planet Stories. Planet did not pay well enough to regularly attract the leading science fiction writers of the day, but did manage to obtain work from well-known names on occasion, including Isaac Asimov and Clifford Simak. In 1952 Planet published Philip K. Dick’s first sale, and went on to print four more of his stories over the next three years.

Space Opera is a subgenre of science fiction that emphasizes space warfare, melodramatic adventure, interplanetary battles, chivalric romance, and risk-taking. Set mainly or entirely in outer space, it usually involves conflict between opponents possessing advanced abilities, futuristic weapons, and other sophisticated technology.

The term has no relation to music, as in a traditional opera, but is instead a play on the terms “soap opera”, a melodramatic television series, and “horse opera”, which was coined during the 1930s to indicate a formulaic Western movie. Space operas emerged in the 1930s and continue to be produced in literature, film, comics, television, and video games.

The Golden Age of Pulp Magazine Fiction derives from pulp magazines (often referred to as “the pulps”) as they were inexpensive fiction magazines that were published from 1896 to the late 1950s. The term pulp derives from the cheap wood pulp paper on which the magazines were printed. In contrast, magazines printed on higher-quality paper were called “glossies” or “slicks”. (Wikipedia)

The pulps gave rise to the term pulp fiction. Pulps were the successors to the penny dreadfuls, dime novels, and short-fiction magazines of the 19th century. Although many writers wrote for pulps, the magazines were proving grounds for those authors like Robert Heinlein, Louis LaMour, “Max Brand”, Ray Bradbury, Philip K. Dick, and many others. The best writers moved onto longer fiction required by paperback publishers. Many of these authors have never been out of print, even long after their passing.

Anthology containing:

Stranger From Space by Hannes Bok
Raiders of the Second Moon by Gene Ellerman
One Against the Stars by Bill Garson
Dust Unto Dust by Lyman D. Hinckley
Sin In Space by Cyril Judd
Image Of Splendor by Lu Kella
An All-American Plague by Teddy Keller
Stellar Showboat by Malcolm Jameson
Tarnished Utopia by Malcom Jameson
Double Jeopardy by Fletcher Pratt
Cosmic Yo-Yo by Ross Rocklynne
Alien Equivalent by Richard Rein Smith
Prison Planet by Wilson Tucker
Warrior of Two Worlds by Manly Wade Wellman
Coming of the Gods by Chester Whitehorn
Invader From Infinity by George Whittington
Mists of Mars by George A. Whittington
The Amphibians by S. Fowler Wright
Highwayman of the Void by Dirk Wylie
Queen of the Flaming Diamond by Leroy Yerxa

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Frank Herbert: Golden Age Space Opera Tales

Frank Herbert: Golden Age Space Opera Tales

Franklin Patrick Herbert Jr. (October 8, 1920 – February 11, 1986) was an American science-fiction author best known for the 1965 novel Dune and its five sequels. Though he became famous for his novels, he also wrote short stories and worked as a newspaper journalist, photographer, book reviewer, ecological consultant, and lecturer.

The Dune saga, set in the distant future, and taking place over millennia, explores complex themes, such as the long-term survival of the human species, human evolution, planetary science and ecology, and the intersection of religion, politics, economics and power in a future where humanity has long since developed interstellar travel and settled many thousands of worlds. Dune is the best-selling science fiction novel of all time, and the whole series is widely considered to be among the classics of the genre.

Space Opera is a subgenre of science fiction that emphasizes space warfare, melodramatic adventure, interplanetary battles, chivalric romance, and risk-taking. Set mainly or entirely in outer space, it usually involves conflict between opponents possessing advanced abilities, futuristic weapons, and other sophisticated technology.

The term has no relation to music, as in a traditional opera, but is instead a play on the terms “soap opera”, a melodramatic television series, and “horse opera”, which was coined during the 1930s to indicate a formulaic Western movie. Space operas emerged in the 1930s and continue to be produced in literature, film, comics, television, and video games.

The Golden Age of Pulp Magazine Fiction derives from pulp magazines (often referred to as “the pulps”) as they were inexpensive fiction magazines that were published from 1896 to the late 1950s. The term pulp derives from the cheap wood pulp paper on which the magazines were printed. In contrast, magazines printed on higher-quality paper were called “glossies” or “slicks”. (Wikipedia)

The pulps gave rise to the term pulp fiction. Pulps were the successors to the penny dreadfuls, dime novels, and short-fiction magazines of the 19th century. Although many writers wrote for pulps, the magazines were proving grounds for those authors like Robert Heinlein, Louis LaMour, “Max Brand”, Ray Bradbury, Philip K. Dick, and many others. The best writers moved onto longer fiction required by paperback publishers. Many of these authors have never been out of print, even long after their passing.

Anthology containing:

Operation Haystack
Missing Link
Old Rambling House

Scroll Up and Get Your Copy Now.

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