Tuesday, April 20, 2021

A Dog Named Kat Anthology

A Dog Named Kat Anthology

There’s a little-known fact that animals can talk.

Every bit as well as humans.

It’s humans that have the real problem – listening.

There are probably a dozen-dozen reasons why we humans won’t simply open up our ears and hear them.

It doesn’t matter what type of animal – dog, cat, cow, crow, coyote.

The other simple fact is: people don’t listen, so they don’t hear. Voices which are every bit as clear as someone standing next to your ear.

Because you don’t listen with your ears – you listen with your mind.

And then you can hear them clearly. No matter what species. No matter their size or lack of it.

Until you can start to hear them, here’s the next best thing…

Stories about humans who can hear all the voices around them – or perhaps just one.

If you can’t hear them yourself, you can at least read about them.

This Anthology Containing:

– A Dog Named Kat by J. R. Kruze
– Voices by J. R. Kruze
– Max Says No by J. R. Kruze
– A Nervous Butt by J. R. Kruze
– A Long Wait for Santa by C. C. Brower
– Cats Typing Romance by R. L. Saunders
– When The Wild Calls by C. C. Brower

Excerpt:

DAD BROUGHT A PUPPY home today. Of course I fell in love with it right off.

Who couldn’t – when it just wants to climb right up and slobber wet kisses all over my face and hands.

But I didn’t smile. I felt better, but not that much.

I just sat on the floor with her and watched her figure out the house. Dad had brought the leftover playthings from her former home. She was the last of the litter, and her own mom had died soon after giving birth. The rest of that litter were black labs, like their mom. This puppy was golden. The color of my own strawberry blond hair.

When I told my Dad I was going to name her Kat, I said it in my usual flat voice. The one I’d had since the funeral. The one that went along without smiling.

It made sense to me. We were both blond. We’d both lost our mom’s. My whole name was Kathleen. And maybe this cute little dog could keep me company.

“Are you serious?” Dad was smiling at me, but when my reaction didn’t change, he nodded. “OK, ‘Kat’ it is.” He pulled out a bag with water- and food-dishes for her and put them by me. And a bag of puppy food to go along.

Then patted my head. “You can put these wherever you think is best. But I’d suggest the kitchen where we can clean up after her more easily.”

Another big bag had a brand new dog bed. Just her size, plus some she could grow into. When Dad put this on the living room floor, Kat walked right over to it, walked around inside it and sniffed, then laid down. Her head went on her paws. I just watched her from where I was kneeling on the carpet.

“Well, I hope this is temporary.”

I raised my eyebrow at this voice in my head. It was coming from Kat.

“What do you think? I’d prefer to be in your room. Don’t worry, I know enough to do my business outside.”

I just nodded at Kat. My Dad was still looking at me, curious about my reaction. So he hadn’t heard Kat at all…

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Tuesday, April 13, 2021

Colored: Golden Age Space Opera Tales

Colored: Golden Age Space Opera Tales

Slavery-Racism has spread even into future history – and has never been completely wiped out.

The modern version has the somewhat polite name of “human trafficking”. And some of that is being born at the wrong area at the wrong time.

But in the future, it’s still there – waiting for us.

We only have to read the prescient writings of those who came before us in order to understand what it is we are fighting, and why.

At least this fiction can paint a different picture than the harsh realities of our present day. And maybe give us some ideas of what can be done to eradicate it – and some courage to do so. Before that future becomes too very real…

Space Opera is a subgenre of science fiction that emphasizes space warfare, melodramatic adventure, interplanetary battles, chivalric romance, and risk-taking. Set mainly or entirely in outer space, it usually involves conflict between opponents possessing advanced abilities, futuristic weapons, and other sophisticated technology.

The term has no relation to music, as in a traditional opera, but is instead a play on the terms “soap opera”, a melodramatic television series, and “horse opera”, which was coined during the 1930s to indicate a formulaic Western movie. Space operas emerged in the 1930s and continue to be produced in literature, film, comics, television, and video games.

The Golden Age of Pulp Magazine Fiction derives from pulp magazines (often referred to as “the pulps”) as they were inexpensive fiction magazines that were published from 1896 to the late 1950s. The term pulp derives from the cheap wood pulp paper on which the magazines were printed. In contrast, magazines printed on higher-quality paper were called “glossies” or “slicks”.

The pulps gave rise to the term pulp fiction. Pulps were the successors to the penny dreadfuls, dime novels, and short-fiction magazines of the 19th century. Although many writers wrote for pulps, the magazines were proving grounds for those authors like Robert Heinlein, Louis LaMour, “Max Brand”, Ray Bradbury, Philip K. Dick, and many others. The best writers moved onto longer fiction required by paperback publishers. Many of these authors have never been out of print, even long after their passing.

Anthology containing:

  • A Bad Town for Spacemen by Robert Scott
  • The Android Kill by John Jakes
  • Tony and the Beetles by Philip K. Dick
  • The York Problem by Herbert D. Kastle
  • Race Riot by Ralph Williams
  • Marley’s Chain by Alan Edward Nourse
  • Failure On Titan by Robert Abernathy
  • Prodigal Weapon by Bill Garson
  • Against Tetrarch by A.A.O. Gilmour
  • The Blue Venus by Robert Emmett McDowell
  • Beyond the Yellow Fog by Robert Emmett McDowell
  • The Great Green Blight by Robert Emmett McDowell

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Wednesday, April 07, 2021

Murray Leinster: Golden Age Space Opera Tales

Murray Leinster: Golden Age Space Opera Tales

Murray Leinster (June 16, 1896 – June 8, 1975) was a nom de plume of William Fitzgerald Jenkins, an American writer of science fiction. He wrote and published more than 1,500 short stories and articles, 14 movie scripts, and hundreds of radio scripts and television plays.

Leinster’s first science fiction story, “The Runaway Skyscraper”, appeared in the February 22, 1919 issue of Argosy, and was reprinted in the June 1926 issue of Hugo Gernsback’s first science fiction magazine, Amazing Stories. In the 1930s, he published several science fiction stories and serials in Amazing and Astounding Stories (the first issue of Astounding included his story “Tanks”). He continued to appear frequently in other genre pulps such as Detective Fiction Weekly and Smashing Western, as well as Collier’s Weekly beginning in 1936 and Esquire starting in 1939.

Space Opera is a subgenre of science fiction that emphasizes space warfare, melodramatic adventure, interplanetary battles, chivalric romance, and risk-taking. Set mainly or entirely in outer space, it usually involves conflict between opponents possessing advanced abilities, futuristic weapons, and other sophisticated technology.

The term has no relation to music, as in a traditional opera, but is instead a play on the terms “soap opera”, a melodramatic television series, and “horse opera”, which was coined during the 1930s to indicate a formulaic Western movie. Space operas emerged in the 1930s and continue to be produced in literature, film, comics, television, and video games.

The Golden Age of Pulp Magazine Fiction derives from pulp magazines (often referred to as “the pulps”) as they were inexpensive fiction magazines that were published from 1896 to the late 1950s. The term pulp derives from the cheap wood pulp paper on which the magazines were printed. In contrast, magazines printed on higher-quality paper were called “glossies” or “slicks”. (Wikipedia)

The pulps gave rise to the term pulp fiction. Pulps were the successors to the penny dreadfuls, dime novels, and short-fiction magazines of the 19th century. Although many writers wrote for pulps, the magazines were proving grounds for those authors like Robert Heinlein, Louis LaMour, “Max Brand”, Ray Bradbury, Philip K. Dick, and many others. The best writers moved onto longer fiction required by paperback publishers. Many of these authors have never been out of print, even long after their passing.

Anthology containing:

  • The Aliens
  • The Fifth-Dimension Tube
  • The Mad Planet
  • Nightmare Planet
  • Doctor
  • Sand Doom
  • Med Ship Man
  • Invasion
  • Third Planet
  • A Thousand Degrees Below Zero

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